This is what war looks like

Byline: | Category: Culture, Economy, Ethics, Government, Taxes & Spending, Uncategorized, wine | Posted at: Friday, 5 December 2014

Mayor Michael Bloomberg promised New York City a war on smoking.  War is what they got.

eric-garner-police-brutality-ramsey-orta

 

While it didn’t do so explicitly, New York’s progressive government decided that smoking was so bad that it was worth killing over.  You may accuse me of hyperbole, but consider that when government passes and enforces any law, it has taken the decision to use the State’s coercive powers against the non-compliant.  Above is a picture of what the law’s coercive powers look like, what a war on smoking looks like.  The “war” in this picture does not look like hyperbole to me.

The law that led to Eric Garner’s death was a prohibition on the selling of loose, untaxed cigarettes.  In other words, Eric Garner was a bootlegger.

Any time that government restricts a willing buyer and a willing seller from agreeing upon a price, a black market will develop.  It is a rule as old as mankind.  During the first Progressive era, the rule was Prohibition and the black market was big.

Eighty-eight Christmases ago sixty New Yorkers lay violently ill in the hospital.  Eight already had died.  The culprit was poisoned alcohol.  But the criminal mind behind the culprit was the government itself.

During Prohibition, alcohol still could be produced.  It was needed in the manufacture of paints and solvents.  So to legally produce it, the government required it to be “denatured”.  Usually that was done with the addition of poisonous methyl alcohol.  But it was a simple chemist’s trick to turn methyl alcohol into ethyl alcohol, which could then be drunk.  By 1926, thousands of amateur chemists were performing that trick and thereby skirting Prohibition’s rules. They had to be stopped.  It was the law, after all, and the law had to be enforced.  So the federal government required the addition of toxic chemicals in industrial alcohol.  The additives included kerosene, strychnine, and formaldehyde.  All are highly poisonous if ingested.  By Prohibition’s end an estimated ten-thousand drinkers were dead.

The ten-thousand were collateral damage.  Nay, they were actively violating the law.  They weren’t just innocent bystanders, but were enemy combatants in the war on drink.  They deserved to die.  After all, they were violating the law.  And if we shrink from enforcing the law, people will cease to have respect for it.

Over the last dozen years, New York City was the central front in the second progressive era’s war on smoking.  Mayor Bloomberg was that front’s field marshal.  He raised the legal age to purchase cigarettes to 21, prohibited smoking in all restaurants, attempted to prohibit it in parks and even apartments, and both he and his successor increased taxes step by step to an absurdly high$5.85 per pack.  At that price the black market is big.  But all this was necessary, Bloomberg and Deblasio have said, because 6,000 New Yorkers die every year from the effects of smoking.

In the war on smoking Eric Garner was an enemy combatant.  And for that offense, the supporters of New York’s war on smoking determined that he deserved to die.  I trust they’re happy with the result.

Share this post:

Comments are closed.