Building little supply siders one Halloween at a time

Byline: | Category: Taxes & Spending | Posted at: Wednesday, 31 October 2007

A little more than six months after April 15th is a second tax day when I get to teach all about the tax system to our children. It’s called the Daddy Tax.

I, having done nothing to earn the candy my children bring home Halloween night, extract from them a candy toll. I alone determine how much I take and what I want–over much protest, it goes without saying. But they have no recourse, no authority to appeal to. Besides, the tax goes to feed the hungry: me–sometime late tomorrow morning when I’m feeling a bit famished before lunch. I can tell I’m having an effect, since my seven year old protested that it wasn’t fair because I did this last year too. “Yes,” I responded. I also added that every year it will get worse.

When they’re older I think I’ll teach them about the Laffer Curve. I’ll raise the Daddy Tax rate so high that they decide that it’s just not worth it to Trick or Treat for very long since I’m just going to confiscate most of what they earn anyway.

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11 Responses to “Building little supply siders one Halloween at a time”

  1. Don Surber Says:

    I thought I invented the Daddy Tax. It had nothing to do with teaching. Everything to do with eating

  2. Volunteer Voters » Tough Laffer Love On Halloween Says:

    [...] Bob Krumm uses Halloween to teach his children a lesson on taxes: When they’re older I think I’ll teach them about the Laffer Curve. I’ll raise the Daddy Tax rate so high that they decide that it’s just not worth it to Trick or Treat for very long since I’m just going to confiscate most of what they earn anyway. [...]

  3. Freddie O'Connell Says:

    Unfortunately, your kids don’t get to vote for a different Daddy. ;)

  4. SayUncle » Halloween Tax Says:

    [...] Future supply siders in the making. Awesome. Though you should point out to your kids that, you know, that’s the price they pay to live under your roof and get room and board. [...]

  5. Bill Hobbs Says:

    That’s hysterical. However, you don’t need to wait until Oct. 31 each year. I impose the “fry tax” every time we go to a fast-food place. I don’t order fries for me, I just take some from each of my kids’ fries, and tell them it’s the fry tax.

    My daughter once complained that taxes were too high and we needed to cut the fry tax.

    I knew right then that I was having a positive impact on her life.

    (Another teachable moment: Whenever your kids ask you to buy something and you want to give them a reason why you won’t, blame the government for taking too much of your money in taxes. They’ll grow up to believe in smaller government.)

  6. Blake Says:

    “Unfortunately, your kids don’t get to vote for a different Daddy.”

    Unfortunately, we don’t get to vote away the IRS or for a new tax code either. :P

  7. martin kennedy Says:

    Bob,

    I commend you parenting skills and approach. Economics is nothing more than formalized common sense. There are myriad opportunities for lessons. I’ll leave my Halloween lesson on V-squared’s blog.

  8. Mike Says:

    A similar plan worked for me over the first year of my daughter’s Trick-or-Treat candy collecting. I simply STOLE some of her candy that first time. This led her to categorize and count her candy cache rather thoroughly the next year (amazing memory for a short little girl). When I tried to steal some again, she told me how many there were and that there needed to be that many remaining when next she checked. Not quite an economics lesson, more of a morality play.

  9. The Daddy Tax Says:

    [...] “Building little supply siders one Halloween at a time”: A little more than six months after April 15th is a second tax day when I get to teach all about the tax system to our children. It’s called the Daddy Tax. [...]

  10. Vol Abroad Says:

    Did you – as Daddy – earn the money to invest in the costumes? Did you perhaps walk them around the neighborhood? Did you indeed pay taxes so that there could be roads and sidewalks and so forth for them to walk around?

    If so – maybe a little Halloween Candy is more than fair recompense.

  11. Chris Says:

    I do something similar with my students – whenever they have candy or snacks in class I’ll snag some and say “candy tax.”