what sense does this make?

Byline: | Category: Uncategorized | Posted at: Thursday, 27 April 2006

As the state avoids open meetings reform, cleaning up the state patrol, implementing real eminent domain protections, and improving our state's education performance, what is it doing? 

Carding old people who want a drink.

I'm with Sen. Steve Cohen on this:

"It is the stupidest law I can ever fathom passing, all about Big Brother getting into your life and telling you what to do."

What sense does it make to force an obvious senior citizen to prove that she is over 21 when she buys a bottle of wine, but doesn't require a citizen to prove that they are who they say they are when they cast a vote?

If the Legislature is now busying itself debating laws with no practical effects, while avoiding debates where action is still necessary, then it's time to save the taxpayers' money, and send them home early.

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7 Responses to “what sense does this make?”

  1. Joseph A Nagy Jr Says:

    Our drinking laws are really draconic anyways. Teach our kids to be responsible drinkers (and show them what one is) and they’ll not go off and kill themselves and others on the road.

  2. George Rand Says:

    While it can be defended on grounds of compelling state interest, I fail to see any difference in principle in making bartenders and store clerks enforce alcohol laws and making employers enforce immigration laws, to say nothing of law enforcement officials.

  3. Joseph A Nagy Jr Says:

    I don’t see how it can be defended even then. It’s a horrid system. Drinking, smoking, sex; it’s all taboo in this country so what do the kids go out and do? They break the taboos and find out that most of it isn’t as bad (at least not immediately) as they were led to believe. That is the road to addiction.

  4. Ameliorations » Girls and Boys in Toy Land Says:

    [...] Bob Krumm brings us news of a new bill in the TN legislature to start carding everyone, even senior citizens, as a way to prevent juvenile drinking. Um, hello? Is this not idiotic? Look at Germany and the U.K. According to this study, between 1975 and 1990 alcohol related traffic fatalities actually decreased steadily. Could this be attributable to increases in vehicle safety laws? Possibly, the article doesn’t track that nor does it track the drinking age. If I recall correctly, though, the minimum drinking age in Germany is 16, compared to 21 in the U.S. Unfortunately I cannot find data from the same time period. The closest I have found is between 1982 and 1992 or 1993. Such studies though can be found here. I will mention though that all sources cite the decrease in BAC limits allowed to be prosecuted as the reason for the decrease in the USA, but I would like to think that groups like the AA, MAAD and other anti-drunk driving and alcohol abuse programs are partly to congratulate. I will be the first to admit, though, that I support anti-driving under the influence laws. More on that in another post, though. I like Sen. Steve Cohen’s remarks about the bill, though. It’s almost as if he’s gone thug gangster on us. “It is the stupidest law I can ever fathom passing, all about Big Brother getting into your life and telling you what to do.” [...]

  5. Ameliorations » Boys and Girls in Toyland Says:

    [...] Bill also brings to our attention proposed fiscal irresponsibility on the part of Bredesen, the same time of irresponsibility he lambasted four years ago. Hypocritical much, Mr. Bredesen? Bob Krumm brings us news of a new bill in the TN legislature to start carding everyone, even senior citizens, as a way to prevent juvenile drinking. Um, hello? Is this not idiotic? Look at Germany and the U.K. According to this study, between 1975 and 1990 alcohol related traffic fatalities actually decreased steadily. Could this be attributable to increases in vehicle safety laws? Possibly, the article doesn’t track that nor does it track the drinking age. If I recall correctly, though, the minimum drinking age in Germany is 16, compared to 21 in the U.S. Unfortunately I cannot find data from the same time period. The closest I have found is between 1982 and 1992 or 1993. Such studies though can be found here. I will mention though that all sources cite the decrease in BAC limits allowed to be prosecuted as the reason for the decrease, but I would like to think that groups like the AA, MAAD and other anti-drunk driving and alcohol abuse programs are partly to congratulate. I will be the first to admit, though, that I support anti-driving under the influence laws. More on that in another post, though. I like Sen. Steve Cohen’s remarks about the bill, though. It’s almost as if he’s gone thug gangster on us. “It is the stupidest law I can ever fathom passing, all about Big Brother getting into your life and telling you what to do.” [...]

  6. Joseph A Nagy Jr Says:

    Sorry for the spam. Post 91 doesn’t exist.

  7. SayUncle » What’s Important? Says:

    [...] So many issues facing the state but our legislators want to card senior citizens for alcohol. Bob Krumm says: If the Legislature is now busying itself debating laws with no practical effects, while avoiding debates where action is still necessary, then it’s time to save the taxpayers’ money, and send them home early. [...]